Lot of liberal pundit handwringing to the effect of "we can close schools now that we know of the great harms to kid's mental health" which, yes, but... (CTU maybe aside) is anyone pushing closures that aren't solely prompted by staff shortages due to their own infections?
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Like pundits seem to be fighting the last war. Excepting SFUSD, they've been mostly back for a year. And even SFUSD isn't headed toward indefinite closures.
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Suppose you think that school closures were a disastrous, invasion-of-Iraq magnitude (or perhaps greater) policy decision. Shouldn't that merit some further reflection?
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You think this was a policy decision (which of course is totally a decentralized one) equivalent to the deaths of 460,000 people and the destabilizing of an entire region? And...do you think parents and educators have not been reflecting, ffs?
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Yeah, I think depriving tens of millions of school children of an in-person education for a year or longer is absolutely on that magnitude. No question.
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I mean, just for starters, where excepting SFUSD were kids kept out of school for a year. Please account for the "tens of millions." And, often, it was their own parents pushing for remote (or at least remote options) until vaccinations were available.
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There are about 50 million schoolchildren and 20 million college students in the US. They experienced a spectrum of disruptions from modest to severe. The total amount of learning loss was extremely large.
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Uh huh. And you would have ordered them all back into in person exactly when? Before we knew something of risks to them? Before their teachers or elderly relatives at home had vaccines? When bodies were piling up in NYC morgues?
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I'm saying the magnitude of societal impacts from these decisions is extremely large and it's ridiculous to suggest it's offensive to talk about that.
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It’s offensive to imply that wrenching policy decisions in the face of mass risk, made by both educators and parents, that everybody knew were fraught, were the same as an illegal WAR that’s lead to 20 years of horror, yes.
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Replying to @ClaraJeffery
Personally, I think the returns to high-quality education, both from a societal and individual standpoint, are extremely high. And I think the literature mostly supports that. I used to think this was a standard liberal viewpoint but apparently it isn't any longer.

Jan 6, 2022 · 3:36 AM UTC

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Replying to @NateSilver538
Nobody’s saying that it isn’t Nate. So when exactly would you have mandated all schools have opened? April 2020? sept? Jan 2021, by which point most had? What would you have done if 40% of teachers quit? Or even more parents pulled kids out altogether?
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Personally, I'd have kept schools open and given teachers hazard pay and lifetime eligibility for Medicare. Because I think high-quality education is extremely valuable and depriving it to tens of millions of children was a huge mistake.
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Not sure what the hell is going on in the states but not closing schools in the UK has been an absolute priority [even for the never-go-be-trusted Tory party]. It’s been incredibly controversial every time they have - in liberal circles as radical left circles (✌️ehh)
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We already have HUGE class-based attainment gaps, and online school have an exponentially worse impact on children in poorer homes. So not sure why people are going after this Nate Silver guy to be honest. For an opinion that is almost uniform in the UK
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