In 2004 respected American archaeologist John E. Clark showed the most ancient mound complexes from Peru to the Mississippi were built according to a common standard of measurement and proportion. Amazing! The academic response so far is a little concerning. In Clark's own words:

12:23 PM · May 9, 2020

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Replying to @davidwengrow
Sassaman argues for a common architectural geometry in mound complexes across the Poverty Point cultural sphere, and extends it to the entire continent of North America. I’ll have to read Clark’s work to see how these two observations compare.
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Do you have a link to the paper? I'm guessing part of the antagonism comes from him being a mormon employed at BYU and people dismissing his evidence just because of that, no matter how good the evidence is.
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Whole book is here. It's a volume edited by two other very well-known and highly respected American archaeologists, who clearly don't think Clark is crazy! Fwiw, I actually met him years ago in Cambridge, and he struck me as a highly sceptical empiricist: epdf.pub/signs-of-power-the-…
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Was that standard based on the human body? I suspect that nearly every culture would have had a body based system, as it's readily available to everyone and already exists in the language (eg. everyone knows the length of an arm). Very convenient too. medium.com/@newapollo/unintu…
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Clark's evidence suggests the calculus was done with cords and string, based on the transformations of equilateral triangles: so, like many forms of advanced mathematical knowledge, it probably originates in weaving technology (and most likely with women).
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Replying to @davidwengrow
He's not crazy & raised interesting ideas but didn't prove them imo. He used only 7 sites-- a few pages for each-- to say 2 continents of people shared a standard unit of measure. He didn't discuss alternative explanations or how the standard diffused or developed independently.
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That's still pretty good going for a single paper! What alternative explanations have been offered for the correspondences Clark found across such a large area? Can you point me to literature? Thanks.
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